Today’s post comes to us from board member China Gorman.

Everywhere you look these days people are focused on the future of work: who will do it, what skills will be needed, how many jobs will robots take? But what about the future of talent? Shouldn’t we be focusing on that as well?

In the next 10-15 years global business enterprises will change dramatically. These profound changes will impact current and future employees in terms of the required speed to adapt to the changing business climate. The demands on employers, educators and policymakers to deliver a new generation of talent for success in an increasingly fast-paced environment means that these three influential groups must collaborate to develop the talent landscape necessary for continued world progress and financial success.

A new organization is being formed to consider this perspective – globally. The Future Talent Council, headquartered in Stockholm, Sweden with staff members in Singapore, the U.K., Australia, and the U.S., is focused on creating an invitation-only membership organization to consider the looming talent issues facing employers all over the world. Members, who are joining now, are from global employer C-suites, University administrations, and policy-making/governing bodies all over the world.

The Council’s first step was to identify 8 Imperatives that all three stakeholder groups need to understand and work together to address:

1) Artificial Intelligence and Intelligent Automation

2) Big Data and Predictive Analytics

3) Diversity/Employing and Empowering Marginalized Populations

4) Ethics, Transparency and Sustainability

5) Flexibility and Work-Life Integration

6) Global Workforce

7) Leadership

8) Lifelong Learning

The second step was to begin to interview global executive leaders in all three stakeholder groups. Today, more than 165 of these interviews have been recorded, with more to come. Whether we talk with the CHROs of global organizations headquartered in North America, Europe, and Asia/Pacific; or the heads of Universities in Hong Kong, Kenya, and the U.K.; or government ministers/leaders in Luxembourg, Lithuania, and The Netherlands; the Council is striking a chord among global leaders who are eager to participate in this future-focused collaborative.

The third step is about to be launched: a global survey of more than 50,000 leaders and managers from organizations in the same three stakeholder groups: large global employers, universities, and regulatory bodies. The survey results will inform a series of white papers, podcasts, newsletters, and webinars.

And the fourth step – an annual step – will be the convening this fall of our first Summit of Council members in Amsterdam for two days. We will “roll up our sleeves” in a variety of working sessions to further identify and discuss the issues impacting the Future of Talent, and lay the groundwork for closer collaboration between the three stakeholder groups to ensure business and societal success.

As the Managing Director of the Council, I can share that our membership is growing every week and the interest in participating in this work is getting stronger and stronger. It’s clear that there is some engagement between these stakeholder groups in national or regional forums, but none that are global and dedicated to the long-term engagement of serious leaders, working on serious solutions. The Future Talent Council is leading this effort.

The Future Talent Council is the outgrowth of founder Lars-Henrik Friis Molin’s history of innovation in the global landscape of talent, education, and policy. If you’d like to participate in our global survey, or would like to nominate a Council member, please reach out to emir.cetinel@futuretalentcouncil.com.

Please share your comments

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.