Here comes Super Bowl LII.  The New England Patriots will meet the Philadelphia Eagles in Minneapolis on February 4th.  And if our prior research continues to hold true, millions of people will call in sick on Monday morning.   This research revealed that  one in 10 U.S. workers said they might not go to work on Monday because of the Super Bowl – a potential loss of 16.5 million people on Monday morning – and another 7.5 million said they may show up late to work.  Whether they are victims of too many nachos, or angst over the outcome of the game, their absence will be a problem for their employers.

We know that at lot of these folks won’t have given their employers a heads up in advance of an early morning message on Monday. These unplanned absences have more negative effects on organizations compared to planned absences, including creating additional workload for others, disrupting the work of co-workers, and increasing stress.  Not to mention hard costs like overtime that may need to be incurred to maintain productivity.

I asked our board members Sharlyn Lauby and John Hollon to join me in a conversation about how organizations can manage through the potential workplace disruptions of major public events like the Super Bowl and the Olympics.  Sharlyn is the President of ITM Group Inc., and is well-known for her well-read blog, HR Bartender. John Hollon is an editor at RecruitingDaily.com, an adjunct professor in the College of Communications at California State University, Fullerton, and a well-known blogger in his own right at The Skeptical Guy.

Big shared events like the Super Bowl and the Olympics are not just productivity sapping distractions and drivers of employee absence.  They can present a great opportunity for organizations to encourage camaraderie and friendly competition in the workplace.

Listen in on our conversation below to learn from these two pros how to reduce the risk of unplanned absences while capitalizing on the opportunity to boost your employee experience:

Play a recording of our conversation here:

Photo by David Straight on Unsplash

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2 thoughts on “Super Bowl Flu – Who’s Out on Monday?

  1. Very relevant topic. In Europe and Latin America experts have estimated that losses in productivity during the World Cup (Soccer) can drop up to 20%. Some companies allow their employees to have a TV set in the office. This helps by dissuading them to ask for permission to leave the office. Some companies have used this to build a stronger community at the company by watching the game together. However when the World Cup was in Asia and the games where played very late at night, absence and late arrivals did rise dramatically.

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