APPlied Humans at Work

Today’s post is courtesy of Joyce Maroney, Executive Director of the Workforce Institute. Joyce recently spoke with Julia Hobsbawm to discuss her new research entitled “APPlied Humans at Work. This research focuses on how organizations are preparing for the increasing convergence of humans and artificial intelligence in the workplace.

It is no surprise that the rise of more and more smart technology in the workplace has created new pressures and challenges for workers. While productivity boosting technologies like mobile devices, the apps that fuel them, and artificial intelligence can enhance our lives at work, they can also increase the likelihood of fatigue, burnout and job insecurity if leaders aren’t concerning themselves with the human side of these strategies.

In order to check in on how well leaders are doing when it comes to these issues of social health, we collaborated with our board member Julia Hobsbawm to conduct research with people directors and academics concerned with productivity in the workplace to get answers to some of the following questions:

  • What do we mean by “Applied Humans at Work”?
  • How can leaders balance technological advances and workplace productivity with humans’ ability to absorb them?
  • What are the implications for human workers of the increasing use of robots to replace or augment human workers?
  • What dangers are there when technology is blurring the boundaries between the professional and private life?
  • Is there a way to structure a digital and therefore ‘always-on’ day in a healthy way?
  • How is technology contributing to employee stress and burnout – and what should organizations be doing to mitigate those impacts?

Below, you can listen to the podcast I recently recorded with Julia to review the results of this research. Hear from Julia about why she is so passionate about this topic of social health.

Conversation with Julia Hobsbawm about APPlied Humans at Work Research

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